Time to Take a Stand – UP!

 

 

Whoever said laughter is the best medicine wasn’t far wrong – although they obviously hadn’t tried Valium.

The physical, psychological and social effects of humour and laughter are as bountiful as Donald Trump’s frontal hair shelf. Studies show that humour and laughter strengthen your immune system, boost your energy, diminish pain, and protect you from the damaging effects of stress. In fact a good old belly laugh can leave your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes.

Making people laugh is therefore giving them a unique gift. And the amazing thing about laughter is that it’s free – unless of course you’re lucky enough to be at one of Brighton & Hove’s many brilliant comedy nights, in which case it can cost you anything from £3 – £30, depending on the experience of the comedians.

If you’ve longed to have your entourage in stitches, but can only ever seem to muster a joke from last year’s Christmas cracker, then help is at the end of your funny bone.

www.lighttrick.co.uk
Louise Stevenson

This October, Brighton Comedy Course is teaming up with Evolution Arts to offer a 6-week beginners course in the art of stand-up. Run by Louise Stevenson (pictured above) a Scottish stand-up who started her comedy career in 1999 on the New Zealand circuit, Brighton Comedy Course is for anyone who wants to:

  • Improve Confidence
  • Enhance public speaking ability
  • Increase presentation skills
  • Write and edit comedy

And who knows, you could go on to be the next stand-up sensation like several previous graduates, including the hilarious Phil Jerrod.The world is your Apollo!

comedy course

Brighton Comedy Course Graduates

I met up with Louise after Brighton Comedy Course’s most recent graduate gig at The Verdict in Kemp Town to ask her a few questions about life in the laughter lane:

Q. What made you get into comedy?

A: Honestly, I love making people laugh and thought I could. I had just moved to Wellington, NZ and I shared my aspirations with the first woman comic I saw performing and she just happened to have space on her comedy course which started the next day, fate maybe.

Q. What are the highs and lows of being a stand-up comedian?

Highs are coming off a stage with a big audience who’ve really enjoyed you. Lows are the travelling from town to town staying in places on your own (there’s a lot of cinema!), And the combination of a high and low is where a woman comes up and says “ My boyfriend totally laughed his arse off and he never thinks women are funny!”

Q. Who is your favourite comedian and why?
Kevin Bridges, because he’s hilarious and talks about a lot of things that I can relate to coming from Glasgow.

Q. How has being a comedian changed you?
Now there’s a question, well it’s given me much more confidence over the years, it also gives you the balls to share something you thinks funny without worrying what the response will be. Who cares-you won’t know its funny till you put it out there.

Q. What are 3 main things you hope people will get from your course?
Confidence, the ability to perform a tight set, and a love of comedy.

Q. TEll us a joke.!
Southern Rail-need I expand?

Give yourself and others the gift of laughter today by booking a place on the Brighton Comedy Course at Evolution Arts here.

www.lighttrick.co.uk
Comedian & Brighton Comedy Course Graduate Phil Jerrod

Jerrod informs us, deadpan, that he’s the most boring man he knows, then riffs off into a fantastic set of perfectly delivered, perfectly timed and perfectly glorious comedy.” BROADWAY BABY

Certainly one to keep an eye on. His tortured ramblings about being white and middle-class run on like the nightmare I imagine it isn’t and made me genuinely laugh out loud” – The Brighton Argus

 @Btncomedycourse

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It’s All About Women

With Mother’s Day last Sunday and International Women’s Day on Tuesday 8th March, this week it’s all about women.

International Women’s Day was originally established in 1911 to, as the Independent puts it: “mark women’s enormous contribution to humankind.” Giving birth to the entire human race might indeed be regarded as an enormous contribution, so they’re not wrong there. But why is a ‘women’s day’ necessary in the 21st Century?

In many places around the world – including the oh-so-enlightened West – women lag lamentably behind men in pay for performing the same job; a mere 55 of the world’s richest 500 people are female; and the closest encounter half the population ever have with a glass ceiling is to clean it. Meanwhile, in 2015, a woman spent five months in a Tehran jail for protesting against the ban on females watching sports in stadiums alongside men, women are routinely seen as the sexual property of men – whether or not they know them – and in too many places on the planet women have to cover themselves from head to toe just in case men can’t control themselves. This, and having to solicit the permission of a man even to avail themselves of a medical intervention on their own bodies, demonstrates just why a day of recognition – if not reckoning – is warranted. As for women’s status in Saudi Arabia, space prohibits us from even listing the injustices women endure there, so here’s a handy link.

399px-Handicapped!_Women's_suffrage_poster,_1910s

And so, if it appears strange that 50% of the human species has to mark on the calendar a day to remind the other 50% of the human species that we are all actually homosapiens, sadly, there are very persuasive reasons for it.

This week there are an abundance of events taking place in countries across the globe to celebrate the social, cultural and economic achievements of women and highlight the pressing issues they continue to face. In the US the newly crowned Queen of Gender Equality, English actress Emma Watson (pictured below) will be one of the speakers at a rally to launch HeForShe Arts Week, a weeklong spotlight on women’s rights and gender equality. In India, SeekSherpa is hosting a series of events tied into International Women’s Day, including an all-girl pub crawl and a bus tour of hidden culinary hotspots in Delhi, whilst Taiwan’s  Girls in Tech evening on March 8 celebrated entrepreneurial women of the web.

220px-Emma_Watson_2013

In London the weeklong WOW (Women of the World) Festival is taking place at the Southbank Centre, and will feature over 150 events, including talks, debates, live music, comedy, dance lessons, workshops and  even a demonstration from the sword-wielding stars of Muslim Girls Fence.

In Evolution’s hometown of Brighton the Women’s Centre and Brighton Dome  put together a special, action-packed day of entertainment, films, workshops, exhibitions and discussions on March 8th, including an exhibition by artist and Evolution Arts tutor Bern O’Donooghue.  In Dead Reckoning, O’Donoghue presents a moving installation from her paper boat art project (see image below) bearing witness to the deaths in 2015 of an estimated 3,771 migrants and refugees who have attempted to cross the Mediterranean in their efforts to reach Europe.

boats

Both Brighton Dome and Dukebox Theatre in Hove, are hosting a whole week of shows and workshops dedicated to celebrating womankind. Highlights include Sandi Toksvig’s live show, Politically Incorrect, local musician Hannah Brackenbury’s brilliant songs about pound shops, selfies, librarians, vodka and cats,  and a night of seriously sassy sketches about all things female from The Fannytasticals.

Evolution Arts offers courses and workshops where women (and men!) have the chance to express and celebrate themselves through a range of artistic mediums including dance, theatre, drawing, music and photography.

 

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Try writing a poem in 5 minutes.

Have you every tried writing a poem? It can be a very liberating experience, and it needn’t take more than 5 minutes.

In our poetry classes at the Brighton studio people sometimes tell us that their childhood experiences of poetry at school were horrendous; their teachers made them learn poems off by heart, or they had to write lengthy essays about poems they didn’t understand.

The way we do things around here is different. Writing poems is a way of playing with words. It can be wildly liberating and fun, even if you have no experience of creative writing whatsoever.

How to write a poem in 5 minutes.

A haiku is usually only three lines long. It’s a form of Japanese poem and it’s beautifully simple. Here’s an example of a Haiku written by Basho in the 1600s;

“The first cold shower;
Even the monkey seems to want
A little coat of straw.”

Isn’t it amazing how this tiny, simple poem has survived for more than four centuries? This traditional haiku form usually involves an indication of the season. Also, if you count the syllables of each line, you’ll find that the first line is 5 syllables, followed by 7 and the final line is 5. This is a great little puzzle to try out on a train, or while you’re waiting for the kettle to boil.

If you’d prefer to try something a bit more free-form, you can do what Jack Kerouac did in the 1960s; he ignored the rules;

“Alone, in old
clothes, sipping wine
Beneath the moon”

Jack Kerouac wrote hundreds of little haikus that were all just snapshots of his daily life. As you can see, a poem can just be a very simple tiny fragment; something you notice about your life.

Here’s an exercise from our poetry course for you to try right now, before you do anything else:

  1. Write a haiku about a thing you can see, and its colour
  2. Write a haiku about the things you can hear
  3. Write a haiku about the quality of the light around you

And no matter how your haiku turned out, share it with us – Jack Kerouac didn’t seem to care how his turned out, they were all beautiful in their own way!

If you enjoyed this post you might enjoy one of our writing courses.

The next poetry workshop in a day is: 22nd February 2015 with Subhadassi.

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